Don’t let them put the wrong brain in your head!

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Over the last few posts I’ve been sharing some ideas about ways to help yourself overcome depression. I’m going to share a lot more of these ideas. They are based on decades of research on effective treatments of depression and related conditions, as well as on many years of experience as both a psychologist and an explorer of my own moods, mind, and behavior. (They will eventually be the basis of my forthcoming book, The Five Stroke Depression Cure.)

But before going on, this might be a good time to discuss a what we might call a “commercial break.”

“Commercial breaks”

TV shows are often interrupted by commercial breaks, those few minutes (or many, many, many minutes!) of advertisements that you are expected to watch as the price of seeing the show.

Commercials are annoying, but they are also powerful. They influence us more than we realize.

Marketing researchers know that the mere fact of frequent exposure to a product, even if the ads annoy you, makes you more likely to think of, and buy, that product when you are in the store or shopping online.

More insidiously, commercials are powerful ways of convincing us of “what’s real.” Commercials are used during political campaigns to get us to accept fictional models of “reality,” to believe that perfectly nice leaders are “crooks,” that tyrants and idiots are the geniuses we’ve been waiting for, and to convince whole nations to go to war or vote against their own interests. We come to believe in the worlds presented in commercials, especially if we see the same messages over and over and over again.

The main concern I want to address is what I might call commercialized “breaks” or really, mental breakdowns. The media are full of ads that try to convince you that, to be frank, you are having a mental breakdown, that you are suffering from the dreaded “chemical imbalance” of depression.

Of course, if your unhappiness, anger, fatigue, and desire to strangle your cat is really due to such a “chemical imbalance,” it stands to reason that the only way to help you with this is to “ask your doctor” to give you some kind of medication.

Big Pharma spends millions every year to insert this “abnormal brain” idea into your head. To convince you that your brain is, in effect, something it isn’t. To convince you that your brain is “abnormal.”

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These are not entirely honest commercials. Depression is a complicated condition. Many things contribute to a depression — it is usually not a condition with a simple physical cause. Thinking habits and attitudes, childhood messages about your worth, as well as things such as traumas, losses, and fatigue, can contribute to a feeling that may or may even be a true clinical depression.

When we are depressed, we feel helpless. The very definition of depression, according to researcher Martin Seligman, was once described as the belief that “nothing I can do will make a difference.” Letting the multibillion dollar drug industry insert an image of a certain sort of “brain problem” into your head can be harmful. It may add to your feelings that you are helpless. You may become dependent, docile, believing that you are nothing without the meds they have. That you can’t make it on your own. What a great way to control you! (When you think about it, it’s the same technique that some abusive partners use.)

Big Pharma knows that depressed persons can be the easiest people to take advantage of. If they can convince you that you have an unbalanced, “abnormal” brain, you will be scared. Which will mean that if I’m selling you overpriced pharmaceuticals, I’ve got you right where I want you.

Because you will be desperate for my cure.

As a specialist in psychological disability, I’ve seen many people whose main psychological problem is sometimes that they have created an image of themselves as helpless. They don’t even try things to feel better anymore, don’t try to find a therapist, to change their lifestyle or exercise or read self-help books to feel better. They have settled into the slow death of passively waiting for others to provide the magical solutions to their malaise (via pills, illegal drugs, dependent relationships with parents or spouses, fairy godmothers, or disability payments).

A mental experiment

Just for fun, try to imagine the following paragraph being read out during a TV commercial for an antidepressant. Imagine it being read in that deep, serious, “caring” professional voice that always reads the drug side effects during drug ads:

Side effects of this medication may include believing that the only treatment for your condition is this medication. Other side effects can include a loss of confidence in your ability to recover on your own, a loss of motivation to try to help yourself, failure to make major life changes that you know are really overdue, and a tendency to see yourself as a permanently “sick” person or “mental patient.” All of which may cause depression to last longer and cut deeper into your soul.

What if there is a better way?

A way to learn to control your own moods, to write your own story? To have control of your own, perfectly normal and lovely and talented and creative brain?

Research has shown that medications are only a part (and not always a necessary part) of effective mental health treatment. Decades of research have shown that psychological treatments may be as effective or more effective.

As usual in this blog, this may be a decision you need to discuss with a doctor or therapist or loved one. But when you do so, discuss concerns and reservations honestly, and as assertively as you can. And remember to include in that discussion the fact that there are lots of things that you can do to manage depressions. Including dozens that I am virtually certain you don’t know about (nobody advertises “journaling” on prime time!)

Simple techniques such as the notebook tools I have just shared, can be powerful ways to treat a mood disorder. Psychotherapy, exercise, mindfulness meditation techniques, yoga, and healthy diets may also contribute a great deal toward your mental well-being. Solving “real life” problems such as stressful job situations, chronic exposure to abusive relationships, isolation, or a failure to express your truest values in your life, may also be effective.

As a last resort, watching less TV and even, in some cases, firing your doctor and finding a better one, may be more useful steps toward cure.

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